An exploration of the UK carer world

B Nyatanga  - Publications 2005 - 2012    


BJCN - British Journal of Community Nursing here

IJPN - International Journal of Palliative Nursing here 

Sage here   BT comment on Sage Review page here

Amazon here

South Bank University here

Ethic Share here

BiomedExperts here    Empathy in palliative care: is it possible to understand another person? related articles here


Links and small text have been added.


2013 Transition from paediatric to adult palliative care: more than a physical change

B Nyatanga - British journal of community nursing, 2013 - internurse.com
The challenges faced by young people with cancer and other palliative care needs have 
been well documented by many, including the charity 'Together for Short Lives'(www. 
togetherforshortlives. org. uk). These young people also have the added challenge of ...



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2012: Nyatanga, B. Is there room at the Inn: palliative care for homeless people. BJCN. Vol 17(10),  October 2012  here


2012: Nyatanga, B. Are GPs ready to talk about death and dying? BJCN. Vol 17(9). September 2012  

                             The right to die is dealt with here


2012: Nyatanga, B. Communicating with dying patients: a time to listen more than talk. BJCN. Vol. 17(8) August 2012  

 

2012: Nyatanga, B. In search of alternative ways of dying. Editorial.  IJPN Vol. 18(7). July 2012   


2012: Nyatanga, B. Inside the mind of a relative at the end of life. BJCN.  17(7). 28th June 2012 


2012: Nyatanga, B. Making a difference through QELCA: engaging community nurses in caring. BJCN Vol. 17, Iss. 6, 31 May 2012, pp 285  


2012: Nyatanga, B. From bowel habits to sexuality: the taboos of caring in palliative care. BJCN Vol. 17, Iss. 5, 04 May 

2012, pp 210 - 21 


2012: Nyatanga, B. Caring about Culture (Editorial). BJCN. 17(4) March  2012.  


2012: Nyatanga, B. Looking after everyone else except yourself: the double edged sword of caring. BJCN 17(2): 109 February 2012  

Looking after everyone except yourself: the double-edged sword of caring

B Nyatanga - British journal of community nursing, 2012 - internurse.com
Caring is, in a broad sense, a basic phenomenon of human life (Benner and Wrubel, 1989; 
Noddings 1999) and an intrinsic part of what it is to be human. In other words, human beings 
may not consciously choose to care, but caring is inherent in them: it is an activity ...

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2012: Idigbe, I.E., Nyatanga, B. Nicol, J. Touching Lives: Making a difference through match making in an HIV clinic. IJPN 18(2): 56-60. February 2012  


2012: Nyatanga, B. Enabling patients to die at home: hidden tensions and barriers. Comment. BJCN 17(1) January 2012 


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2011: Nyatanga, B. Death and Dying. In Birchenall and Adams, N. (eds). The Nursing Companion. Basingstoke, Palgrave

          Macmillan  

            The right to die is dealt with here


2011: Nyatanga, B. In pursuit of cultural competence: service accessibility and acceptability. International Journal of 

         Palliative Nursing. 17(5) p212- 215 

Abstract

Inequalities in end-of-life care provision are well documented and are a priority for organizations both nationally and internationally. It is well recognized that end-of-life care should be provided not just for patients with cancer, and that access to services should be based on need rather than on disease. Of even greater importance, particularly in multicultural societies, is the realization that such services should also be accessible to all, regardless of gender, culture, religion, ethnicity, etc. To achieve this, a degree of cultural sensitivity across care provision sectors is a prerequisite. Services must be acceptable as well as accessible to all, regardless of ethnic or cultural background.   source

cf

The pursuit of cultural competence: service accessibility and acceptability

B Nyatanga - International journal of palliative nursing, 2011 - internurse.com
214 International Journal of Palliative Nursing 2011, Vol 17, No 5 offer is a main reason for 
their underutilization. A lack of cultural sensitivity may mean:● A discrepancy or mismatch 
between service provision and the needs to be met● Lack of confidence among patients ...


2011: Nyatanga, B. Reaching out: doing ‘good’ in the name of palliative care. IJPN (editorial) 17(6)  


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2010: Nyatanga, B. Survivorship: Living with and beyond cancer. IJPN, editorial. 16(2)  


2010: Nyatanga, B. Talking openly about death. IJPN, editorial. 16(6) Nyatanga, L.,


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2009: Nyatanga, B. Are your shoe laces shortening? Editorial. IJPN 15(2) 


2009: Nyatanga, B. A passage to Switzerland. Editorial IJPN 15(7) The right to die is dealt with here


2009: Nyatanga, B. When last offices are more than a white sheet. Comment. British Journal of Nursing 18(17) 

When last offices are more than just a white sheet

B Nyatanga, H de Vocht - British Journal of Nursing, 2009 - internurse.com
The recently published End of Life Care Strategy in the UK encourages people to talk openly 
about death and dying (Department of Health, 2008). The idea should not only be applicable 
to palliative care settings, but to other healthcare environments and the public sector. It is ...


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2008: Why is it so difficult to die? 2nd edition some here    The right to die is dealt with here


2008; Intuition in clinical decision-making: a psychological penumbra IJPN 14(10) 492- 496 

Intuition in clinical decision-making: a psychological penumbra

B Nyatanga, H Vocht - International journal of palliative nursing, 2008 - internurse.com
Abstract Aim: To demonstrate the link between intuition and cognitive as well as 
physiological processes as a way of helping to explain how intuition plays a part in complex 
decision-making. Background: Over the years, numerous debates and discussions have ...
Cited by 11 Related articles All 9 versions Cite Save                                                                                                                                                                                                     van-osch.com [PDF]


Adapting to Death, Dying and Bereavement

B Nyatanga - Handbook of Palliative Care, 2008 - books.google.com
Our fear of death and the loss of a loved one are two of the most monumental emotional 
challenges of human existence. This anxiety is usually suppressed and is only exposed 
when the reality of a possible death is confronted. Fear of death stems from different ...

 


2008: Nyatanga, B. Cultural competence; a noble idea in a changing world. Editorial. International journal of palliative nursing. 14(7) 

Cultural competence: a noble idea in a changing world

B Nyatanga - International journal of palliative nursing, 2008 - internurse.com
AUSTRALIA Donna Drew Clinical Nurse Consultant, Paediatric Oncology/ Palliative Care, Prince 
of Wales Children's Hospital, New South Wales Kate White Associate Professor Cancer and 
Palliative Care, Head, School of Nursing and Public Health, Edith Cowan University, ...

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2007: Health Professionals’ opposition to euthanasia and assisted suicide: a personal view. IJPN 13(7) 351-355 


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2006: Towards a definition of death anxiety. IJPN 12 (9) 410-413 

Towards a definition of death anxiety

B Nyatanga, H de Vocht - International Journal of Palliative Nursing, 2006 - internurse.com
some of these here. Indulging in such a philosophical dialogue is intended to first, highlight 
the elusive nature of this concept and second, bring about possible understanding. This may 
in turn lead us to find how best to research and/or teach the concept, and inform ...


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2005: Is fear of death itself a rational preoccupation? IJPN 11(12) 643- 645    The right to die is dealt with here

Is fear of death itself a rational preoccupation?

B Nyatanga - International journal of palliative nursing, 2005 - internurse.com
Correspondence to: Brian Nyatanga or post-death existence, it becomes crucial, if one was 
to refute the assertion, that proof is established of the difference between the two extreme 
existences. This was made by Nagel (1970) who argues that there is a difference between ...
Cited by 4 Related articles All 6 versions Cite Save                                                                                                                                                                                                                  worc.ac.uk [PDF]


Do pilot studies have any value in research?

B Nyatanga - International journal of palliative nursing, 2005 - internurse.com
... Contents - internurse 11(7): Jul 2005. Do pilot studies have any value in research? in pdf format
Do pilot studies have any value in research? (60kb). Brian Nyatanga International Journal of
Palliative Nursing 11(7) : 312 (Jul 2005). view abstract; view article; Request Permissions ...


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2002  Culture, palliative care and multiculturalism

B Nyatanga - International journal of palliative nursing, 2002 - internurse.com
Abstract The frequently asked question,'Why do minority ethnic groups not access palliative 
care?'needs closer analysis. This article sets out to revisit the context and principles of 
palliative care and discuss why palliative care services are not accessed equally by all ...




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2001 cultural diversity

B Nyatanga, M Senior - International journal of palliative nursing, 2001 - internurse.com
Recognition and promotion of cultural diversity is a central theme in many areas of modern 
life: health care, sport, politics, religion, education, industry and society at large. Cultural diversity 
is no more than rhetoric, however, unless people understand and appreciate diversity so ...


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1997  Cultural issues in palliative care

B Nyatanga - International Journal of Palliative Nursing, 1997 - internurse.com
When providing palliative care to any patient, the carer must have an idea of the patient's value 
and belief system. This is particularly important in societies like Britain's, which, at one time almost 
entirely Christian, have become more plural in recent decades. Britain's National Council ...






Psychosocial theories of patient non-compliance.

B Nyatanga - Professional nurse (London, England), 1997 - europepmc.org
Patient non-compliance with medication should not be viewed as an act of defiance. 
Medication non-compliance can have a negative impact on care. Nurses need to 
understand the reasons for non-compliant behaviour. Psychosocial theories are useful in ...

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External Responsibilities 

External examiner for Dundee University - masters degree in Palliative care 


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